RWW 123 Create an Even Chamfer By Hand

Using a block plane to create a chamfer or even to just break the corners on your project is no big deal.  But extending that chamfer around corners and keeping the angle and depth consistent can take some practice.  I show you a quick way to do this with only your fingers as a fence.

8 Responses to “RWW 123 Create an Even Chamfer By Hand”

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  1. I have the same jig and block plane and came to the same conclusion. I think something else with chamfers that I had to learn is that there is a difference between a chamfer and just breaking the edge.

  2. Nik Brown says:

    Nice tip. I ve always cut my chamfers with the board face down on the bench like you did when doing the cross grain. I LIke this technique better. Thanks!

    • Shannon says:

      as you can see from that second shot I still do it that way sometimes too. If you get the angle right you can rest the plane edge on the benchtop and get it just right. I wouldn’t recommend it for a longer stretch but for that short cross grain section it worked find.

  3. Eric Fortin says:

    Nice trick Shannon. By the way, the production quality of your video has been improving constantly recently.

  4. Yet another tip for us to add to the arsenal. I love my block plane, and I find sometimes, it’s quicker than dragging out the router. Thanks for a great video.
    Martin.

  5. Tom Buhl says:

    Shannon, I’ve generally interpreted the miter line on a chamfer as an after the fact analysis. Today I used that as the guide when creating a small chamfer on the lid for a box. Thanks for the tip. Very satisfying way to sneak up on the “fit.”
    You rock.

  6. Michael says:

    Great video. Should I purchase a low angle or a standard angle plane for chamfering? I have a LN low angle rabbet plane already. Would that be a good one to use? Thanks

    • Shannon says:

      I guess technically a standard angle plane would be best for working a chamfer since they are usually along the face or edge grain, but truly with so little wood being removed I don’t think you need worry about it. Use what you already have, no reason to buy anything special for a task just about any plane can handle.

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